Two Twirly Maids

Though the origins of the folksong “Two Twirly Maids” may predate Victorian London, it’s linked in popular culture to the story of, respectively, 14-and 13-year-old Minnie and Margaret Chattoway, who in 1845 were found guilty of murdering Leonard Brewer. The sisters confessed to cutting his throat and attempting to dismember the body, though they ultimately failed at the task and left a gruesome scene for police to discover.

The Chattoway sisters were sentenced to death, but the sentence was commuted to transportation. In March of 1845, the sister boarded a ship heading to a penal colony in Australia. Once the ship disembarked, the girls managed to escape and were never seen again.

Two twirly maids
cutting off his head,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw today.

Two twirly maids
sawing off his arms,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw today.

Two twirly maids
chopping off his legs,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw today.

Two twirly maids
burying the rest,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw,
O, that’s what I saw today.

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